FIRST EDITION LION HANDBOOKS

1943 Cub Scout Trail and Color Plates
First Edition A (1930-1936)
4 1/2" x 7"
First Edition B "Price 20¢" (1936)
4 1/2" x 7"
First Edition B (March 1937)
4 1/2" x 7"
First Edition C (1938)
4 1/2" x 7"
First Edition C (1939-1943)
4 1/2" x 7"
First Edition C (1944-1946)
4 1/2" x 7"
One Line Bottom (March 1946)
4 1/2" x 7"
Bridge Pamphlet (1947)
4 3/8" x 6 3/4"
Back
 
Typical Page Typical Color Page  

First Edition - Cover A (1930-1936):

Edition Notes: Cover art by Andy Janson. 144 pages, 4 1/2” x 7”. Illustrations were ink drawings by Andy Janson.

Historical Notes: Akela, Baloo, and Mowgli from Kipling’s “Jungle Book” had been transferred to North America. The lion, of course, did not appear in Jungle Book. It was added as a passing nod to the “British Lion”. Tests and award schemes were rewritten with help from educators and child psychologists. The Lion Cubs that used this book were 11 years old.

Quote: Did you ever see a real lion cub at the zoo or the circus? They certainly are active, alert chaps with a paw always ready to use in doing something as they play. The job of the big mother lion is to get the cub to do things on his own--to teach him to hide and to run and to spring and to keep very still when necessary. He must know where to find food and how to smell trouble too. The purpose of it all is to get him ready to go out and do for himself.

First Edition - Cover B (1937-1946):

Edition Notes: Cover art by Andy Janson. 144 pages until wartime restrictions dropped it to 124 pages. 4 1/2” x 7”. Illustrations were ink drawings by Andy Janson.

Historical Notes: Cubbing underwent several changes during this time. The Webelos Rank, later called “Arrow of Light”, was created in 1941. Cubs BSA became Cub Scouts in 1945.

Bridge Pamphlet - (1947):

Edition Notes: This was a 16 page pamphlet, 4 3/8” x 6 3/4” issued in 1947. It was designed to be sold with The Lion Cubbook and was the first to call Lions “Cub Scouts.”

Historical Notes: The pamphlet was issued in 1947 to serve as a stop-gap measure during the long delayed development of the Second Edition Cub Scout books. With lowering of age brackets still up in the air, the pamphlet provided an outlet for some important changes to the program that more quickly achieved consensus.